This is an accompanying blog post to my YouTube video Dynamics 365 Customer Engagement Deep Dive: Creating a Basic Plug-in, the second in a series aiming to provide tutorials on how to accomplish developer focused tasks within Dynamics 365 Customer Engagement. You can watch the video in full below:

Below you will find links to access some of the resources discussed as part of the video and to further reading topics:

PowerPoint Presentation (click here to download)

Full Code Sample

using System;
using System.Globalization;

using Microsoft.Xrm.Sdk;

namespace D365.SamplePlugin
{
    public class PreContactCreate_FormatNameValues : IPlugin
    {
        public void Execute(IServiceProvider serviceProvider)
        {
            //Obtain the execution context from the service provider.

            IPluginExecutionContext context = (IPluginExecutionContext)serviceProvider.GetService(typeof(IPluginExecutionContext));

            //Extract the tracing service for use in debugging sandboxed plug-ins

            ITracingService tracingService = (ITracingService)serviceProvider.GetService(typeof(ITracingService));

            tracingService.Trace("Tracing implemented successfully!");

            if (context.InputParameters.Contains("Target") && context.InputParameters["Target"] is Entity)

            {
                Entity contact = (Entity)context.InputParameters["Target"];

                string firstName = contact.GetAttributeValue<string>("firstname");
                string lastName = contact.GetAttributeValue<string>("lastname");

                TextInfo culture = new CultureInfo("en-GB", false).TextInfo;

                if (firstName != null)
                {

                    tracingService.Trace("First Name Before Value = " + firstName);
                    contact["firstname"] = culture.ToTitleCase(firstName.ToLower());
                    tracingService.Trace("First Name After Value = " + contact.GetAttributeValue<string>("firstname"));

                }

                else

                {
                    tracingService.Trace("No value was provided for First Name field, skipping...");
                }

                if (lastName != null)

                {
                    tracingService.Trace("Last Name Before Value = " + lastName);
                    contact["lastname"] = culture.ToTitleCase(lastName.ToLower());
                    tracingService.Trace("Last Name After Value = " + contact.GetAttributeValue<string>("lastname"));
                }

                else

                {
                    tracingService.Trace("No value was provided for Last Name field, skipping...");
                }

                tracingService.Trace("PreContactCreate_FormatNameValues plugin execution complete.");

            }
        }
    }
}

Download/Resource Links

Visual Studio 2017 Community Edition

Setup a free 30 day trial of Dynamics 365 Customer Engagement

C# Guide (Microsoft Docs)

Source Code Management Solutions

Further Reading

MSDN – Plug-in development

MSDN – Supported messages and entities for plug-ins

MSDN – Sample: Create a basic plug-in

MSDN – Debug a plug-in

I’ve written a number of blog posts around plug-ins previously, so here’s the obligatory plug section 🙂 :

Interested in learning more about JScript Form function development in Dynamics 365 Customer Engagement? Then check out my previous post for my video and notes on the subject. I hope you find these videos useful and do let me know if you have any comments or suggestions for future video content.

When working with Virtual Machines (VM’s) on Azure that have been deployed using a Linux Operating System (Ubuntu, Debian, Red Hat etc.), you would be forgiven for assuming that the experience would be rocky when compared with working with Windows VM’s. Far from it – you can expect an equivalent level of support for features such as full disk encryption, backup and administrator credentials management directly within the Azure portal, to name but a few. Granted, there may be some difference in the availability of certain extensions when compared with a Windows VM, but the experience on balance is comparable and makes the management of Linux VM’s a less onerous journey if your background is firmly rooted with Windows operating systems.

To ensure that the Azure platform can effectively do some of the tasks listed above, the Azure Linux Agent is deployed to all newly created VM’s. Written in Python and supporting a wide variety of common Linux distributable OS’s, I would recommend never removing this from your Linux VM; no matter how tempting this may be. The tradeoff could cause potentially debilitating consequences within Production environments. A good example of this would be if you ever needed to add an additional disk to your VM. This task would become impossible to achieve without the Agent present on your VM. As well as having the proper reverence for the Agent, it’s important to keep an eye on how the service is performing, even more so if you are using Recovery Services vaults to take snapshots of your VM and back up to another location. Otherwise, you may start to see errors like the one below being generated whenever a backup job attempts to complete:

It’s highly possible that many administrators are seeing this error at the time of writing this post (January 2018). The recent disclosures around Intel CPU vulnerabilities have prompted many cloud vendors, including Microsoft, to roll out emergency patches across their entire data centres to address the underlying vulnerability. Whilst it is commendable that cloud vendors have acted promptly to address this flaw, the pace of the work and the dizzying array of resources affected has doubtless led to some issues that could not have been foreseen from the outset. I believe, based on some of the available evidence (more on this later), that one of the unintended consequences of this work is the rise of the above error message with the Azure Linux Agent.

When attempting to deal with this error myself, there were a few different steps I had to try before the backup started working correctly. I have collected all of these below and, if you find yourself in the same boat, one or all of them should resolve the issue for you.

First, ensure that you are on the latest version of the Agent

This one probably goes without saying as it’s generally the most common answer to any error 🙂 However, the steps for deploying updates out onto a Linux machine can be more complex, particularly if your primary method of accessing the machine is via an SSH terminal. The process for updating your Agent depends on your Linux version – this article provides instructions for the most common variants. In addition, it is highly recommended that the auto-update feature is enabled, as described in the article.

Verify that the Agent service starts successfully.

It’s possible that the service is not running on your Linux VM. This can be confirmed by executing the following command:

service walinuxagent start

Be sure to have your administrator credentials handy, as you will need to authenticate to successfully start the service. You can then check that the service is running by executing the ps -e command.

Clear out the Agent cache files

The Agent stores a lot of XML cache files within the /var/lib/waagent/ folder, which can sometimes cause issues with the Agent. Microsoft has specifically recommended that the following command is executed on your machine after the 4th January if you are experiencing issues:

sudo rm -f /var/lib/waagent/*.[0-9]*.xml

The command will delete all “old” XML files within the above folder. A restart of the service should not be required. The date mentioned above links back to the theory suggested earlier in this post that the Intel chipset issues and this error message are linked in some way, as the dates seem to tie with when news first broke regarding the vulnerability.

If you are still having problems

Read through the entirety of this article, and try all of the steps suggested – including digging around in the log files, if required. If all else fails, open a support request directly with Microsoft.

Hopefully, by following the above steps, your backups are now working again without issue 🙂

This is an accompanying blog post to my YouTube video Dynamics 365 Customer Engagement Deep Dive: Creating a Basic Jscript Form Function, the first in a series that aims to provide tutorials on how to accomplish developer focused tasks within Dynamics 365 Customer Engagement. You can watch the video in full below:

Below you will find links to access some of the resources discussed as part of the video and to further reading topics.

PowerPoint Presentation (click here to download)

Full Code Sample

function changeAddressLabels() {

    //Get the control for the composite address field and then set the label to the correct, Anglicised form. Each line requires the current control name for 'getControl' and then the updated label name for 'setLabel'

    Xrm.Page.getControl("address1_composite_compositionLinkControl_address1_line1").setLabel("Address 1");
    Xrm.Page.getControl("address1_composite_compositionLinkControl_address1_line2").setLabel("Address 2");
    Xrm.Page.getControl("address1_composite_compositionLinkControl_address1_line3").setLabel("Address 3");
    Xrm.Page.getControl("address1_composite_compositionLinkControl_address1_city").setLabel("Town");
    Xrm.Page.getControl("address1_composite_compositionLinkControl_address1_stateorprovince").setLabel("County");
    Xrm.Page.getControl("address1_composite_compositionLinkControl_address1_postalcode").setLabel("Postal Code");
    Xrm.Page.getControl("address1_composite_compositionLinkControl_address1_country").setLabel("Country");

    if (Xrm.Page.getControl("address2_composite_compositionLinkControl_address2_line1"))
        Xrm.Page.getControl("address2_composite_compositionLinkControl_address2_line1").setLabel("Address 1");

    if (Xrm.Page.getControl("address2_composite_compositionLinkControl_address2_line2"))
        Xrm.Page.getControl("address2_composite_compositionLinkControl_address2_line2").setLabel("Address 2");

    if (Xrm.Page.getControl("address2_composite_compositionLinkControl_address2_line3"))
        Xrm.Page.getControl("address2_composite_compositionLinkControl_address2_line3").setLabel("Address 3");

    if (Xrm.Page.getControl("address2_composite_compositionLinkControl_address2_city"))
        Xrm.Page.getControl("address2_composite_compositionLinkControl_address2_city").setLabel("Town");

    if (Xrm.Page.getControl("address2_composite_compositionLinkControl_address2_stateorprovince"))
        Xrm.Page.getControl("address2_composite_compositionLinkControl_address2_stateorprovince").setLabel("County");

    if (Xrm.Page.getControl("address2_composite_compositionLinkControl_address2_postalcode"))
        Xrm.Page.getControl("address2_composite_compositionLinkControl_address2_postalcode").setLabel("Postal Code");

    if (Xrm.Page.getControl("address2_composite_compositionLinkControl_address2_country"))
        Xrm.Page.getControl("address2_composite_compositionLinkControl_address2_country").setLabel("Country");
}

Download/Resource Links

Visual Studio 2017 Community Edition

Setup a free 30 day trial of Dynamics 365 Customer Engagement

W3 Schools JavaScript Tutorials

Source Code Management Solutions

Further Reading

MSDN – Use JavaScript with Microsoft Dynamics 365

MSDN – Use the Xrm.Page. object model

MSDN – Xrm.Page.ui control object

MSDN – Overview of Web Resources

Debugging custom JavaScript code in CRM using browser developer tools (steps are for Dynamics CRM 2016, but still apply for Dynamics 365 Customer Engagement)

Have any thoughts or comments on the video? I would love to hear from you! I’m also keen to hear any ideas for future video content as well. Let me know by leaving a comment below or in the video above.

With 2018 now very firmly upon us, it’s time again to see what’s new in the world of Dynamics 365 certification. Nothing much has changed this time around, but there are a few noteworthy updates to be aware if you are keen to keep your certifications as up to date as possible. Here’s my round-up of what’s new – let me know in the comments if you think I have missed anything out.

MCSE Business Applications 2018

The introduction of a dedicated Microsoft Certified Solutions Architect (MCSA) and Microsoft Certified Business Applications (MCSE) certification track for Dynamics 365 was a positive step in highlighting the importance of Dynamics 365 alongside other core Microsoft products. Under the new system, those wishing to maintain a “good standing” MCSE will need to re-certify each year with a brand new exam to keep their certification current for the year ahead. Those who obtained their MCSE last year will now notice on their certificate planner the opportunity to attain the 2018 version of the competency via the passing of a single exam. For Dynamics 365 Customer Engagement focused professionals, assuming you only passed either the Sales or Customer Service exam last year, passing the other exam should be all that is required to recertify – unless you fancy your chances trying some of the new exams described below.

New MCSE Exams

Regardless of what boat you are relating to the Business Applications MCSE, those looking to obtain to 2018 variant of the certification can expect to see two additional exams available that will count towards the necessary award requirements:

The exams above currently only appear on the US Microsoft Learning website but expect them to appear globally within the next few weeks/months.

MB2-877 represents an interesting landmark in Microsoft’s journey towards integrating FieldOne as part of Dynamics CRM/Dynamics 365 Customer Engagement, with it arguably indicating the ultimate fruition of this journey. To pass the exam,  you are going to have to have a good grasp of the various entities involved as part of the field service app, as well as a thorough understanding of the mobile application itself. As is typically the case when it comes to Dynamics 365 certification, the Dynamics Learning Portal (DLP) is going to be your destination for preparatory learning resources for the exam; along with a good play around with the application itself within a testing environment. If you have access to the DLP, it is highly recommended you complete the following courses at your own pace before attempting the exam:

Dynamics 365 for Retail is a fairly new addition to the “family” and one which – admittedly – I have very little experience with. It’s rather speedy promotion to exam level status I, therefore, find somewhat surprising. This is emphasised further by the fact that there are no dedicated exams for other, similar applications to Field Service, such as Portals. Similar to MB2-877, preparation for MB6-897 will need to be directed primarily through DLP, with the following recommended courses for preparation:

Exam Preparation Tips

I’ve done several blog posts in the past where I discuss Dynamics CRM/Dynamics 365 exams, offering help to those who may be looking to achieve a passing grade. Rather than repeat myself (or risk breaking any non-disclosure agreements), I’d invite you to cast your eyes over these and (I hope!) that they prove useful in some way as part of your preparation:

If you have got an exam scheduled in, then good luck and make sure you study! 🙂