If you are heavily involved with the management and deployment of Office 365 Click-to-Run installation packages on a daily basis, the chances are that you have come across all sorts of weird and wonderful error messages throughout your travels. Although I am admittedly a novice in this area, I know there is oft the requirement to resort to registry modifications or similar to achieve certain kinds of management tasks, along with a whole list of other quirks that can test the patience of even the most ardent of IT professionals and frustrate what may appear to be simplistic Office 365 deployments.

Case in point – the installation of the downloadable Click-to-Run Office 365 installation package (available from the Office 365 portal) can be complicated when installing it via the default Administrator account on a Windows machine. When attempting to do this, either by double-clicking the executable file or executing it using Run as administrator privileges, you may get the following error message displayed below:

The error can occur in any version of Windows, up to and including Windows 10 1803 Build. The issue appears to pertain to the default Administrator account that is created on the operating system and can be observed occurring when creating a new Windows 10 Virtual Machine on Azure. It’s possible that the error may also occur in desktop versions of the operating system, depending on how the initial local administrator user account is deployed. There are a couple of ways to resolve this error, depending on your preferred method, familiarity with working with the inner engines of Windows and your inclination towards either a quick or “proper” solution.

The quick and easy solution

This route involves the creation of a new user account on the machine, which can then be logged into and used to install the application via User Account Control elevated privileges. The steps to achieve this are as follows:

  1. Type Windows + R on the start menu to open the Run box.
  2. Enter lusrmgr.msc in the Run box and hit enter. This will open the Local Users and Groups Microsoft Management Console (MMC) snap-in.
  3. Right-click on the Users folder and select New User
  4. Create a new user account with the required details and password. Ensure that the account is not disabled via the Account is disabled button and click Create to…well…create the account. 🙂
  5. Log out of Windows and log back in as the new user. When attempting to run the installation package again, you should be (correctly) prompted to enter Administrator credentials via the UAC control dialog and the installation should start successfully.

The proper solution

Although the above steps are perfectly acceptable and straightforward to follow if you are in a rush, they do not address the underlying problem with the default Administrator account – namely, that it will have issues installing any application that requires elevated privileges. In most cases, where an application requires installation onto a machine, it is generally better to login as the Administrator user account as opposed to relying solely on the UAC elevation prompt. As a consequence, the most ideal solution to save you from any future hassle is to fix the issue with the default Administrator account permanently.

Following some research online and testing on my side, I found this article which goes through the steps that will successfully address the problem and enable you to install Office 365 – and any other program – without issue. In my specific example, I had to follow the instructions listed in Method 2 and 3, followed by a restart of the machine in question, before I was able to install Office 365 successfully. Although the steps involved are a little more complex and error-prone, the article does provide clear instructions, along with screenshots, to help you along the way.

Conclusions or Wot I Think

I recently attended a Microsoft Partner training day covering Microsoft 365 Business and Enterprise and the topic of Office 365 came up regularly, as you can imagine. The deployment settings afforded to you via Microsoft 365 let you perform automated actions in a pinch, with perhaps the most common one being the removal of any local administrator privileges when a new machine is deployed using your organisation’s chosen template. As our instructor pointed out, this is incompatible with how Office 365 installations operate; because, as we have seen, full administrative privileges are required to install the software. We, therefore, find ourselves in this strange state of affairs where the Microsoft 365 solution as a whole is in a glass half full (or half empty, if you are feeling pessimistic) situation and, more generally, Office 365 deployments are hampered due to requiring local or domain level Administrator privileges. I would hope that, eventually, Microsoft would look to providing an installation package of Office that does not require such extensive permissions to install. Doing this would kill two birds with one stone – it would help to make the deployment of all the components of Microsoft 365 a breeze whilst also avoiding the error message discussed in this post. Here’s hoping that we see this change in the future to avoid interesting little side-journeys like this when deploying Office 365.

PowerApps is very much the in vogue topic at the moment, particularly if you are a Dynamics 365 Customer Engagement professional reconciling yourself with the new state of affairs. The previous sentence may sound negative but is very much contrary to my opinion on PowerApps, which I am finding increased use cases for each day when working to address certain business requirements. Whether you are looking to implement a barcode scanning application or something much more expansive, the set of tools that PowerApps provides from the outset means that traditional developers can very easily achieve solutions that would previously take Visual Studio and a whole breadth of programming knowledge to realise.

On the topic of developers, one thing that they may have to assuage themselves with when working with PowerApps is the inability to display dialog messages within the app when some kind of alert needs to be provided to the user. A typical scenario for this could be to request that the user completes all fields on a form before moving to the next screen, ensuring that an appropriate message is displayed reflecting this fact. Whilst there is no current way of achieving this via a dedicated pop-up control or similar, there are ways that this behaviour can be imitated using existing Label controls and a bit of function wizardry.

The best way to illustrating how to accomplish this is to view an example PowerApps app. Below are screenshots of a very simple two-screen app, with several Text Inputs, a Button and Label control:

The required functionality of the app is to allow navigation to the ‘Thanks for your submission!’ screen only if the user has entered data into all of the Text Input controls on the first screen; if this condition is not met, then the user should be prevented from moving to the next screen and an error message should be displayed to advise the user accordingly.

The first step is to create the error message and required text on the first screen. This can be straightforwardly achieved via an additional Label control, with some text formatting and colour changes to make it noticeable to the user.

As with many other controls within PowerApps, you have the ability to toggle the visibility of Labels either on a consistent or variable basis. The Visible property is your go-to destination for this and, as the next step, the value of this field should be updated to read ErrorVisible – the name of a variable storing the state of the controls visibility (either true or false). If done correctly, as indicated in the screenshot below, you will notice that the Label control will immediately disappear from the screen on the right. This is because the default value of the newly specified variable is false.

The next step involves the invocation of a somewhat complex PowerApps function to implement the required logic on the Button control. The entire function to use is reproduced below in its entirety:

If(Or(IsBlank(TextInput1.Text),IsBlank(TextInput2.Text),IsBlank(TextInput3.Text),IsBlank(TextInput4.Text)), Set(ErrorVisible, true), Navigate(Screen2,ScreenTransition.Fade))

To break the above down for those who are unfamiliar with working with functions:

  • IsBlank does exactly what it says on the tin, but it’s important to emphasise that to check whether a field contains a value or not, you have to specify the Text property of the control.
  • The Set function enables us to specify the values of variables on the fly, whether they have been declared already or not somewhere else on the app. No additional syntax is required, making it very straightforward to create runtime variables that store values throughout an entire app session.
  • Navigate specifies any other screen on the app to open. We can also select a transition effect to use which, in this case, is the Fade transition.
  • Finally, all of the above is wrapped around an If logic statement that prevents the user from moving to the next screen if any of the Text Input controls do not contain a value (courtesy of the Or statement).

The function needs to be entered within the OnSelect property of the button control, and your form should resemble the below if done correctly:

With everything configured, its time to give the app a test drive. 🙂 The sequence below provides a demonstration of how the app should work if all of the above steps are followed:

A final, potentially optional step (depending on what your app is doing), is to ensure that the error message is hidden as soon as the user navigates away from the 1st screen. This can be achieved by updating the ErrorVisible variable back to false as soon as the user navigates onto the second screen, as indicated in the screenshot below:

Conclusions or Wot I Think

PowerApps is still very much a product in its infancy, very neatly fitting into the new wave of Microsoft products with regular release cycles, feature updates and ongoing development. It can be, therefore, unrealistic to expect a full range of features which satisfy all business scenarios to be available at this juncture. Having said that, one feature that could be added to greatly benefit data entry into forms is the ability to display pop-out dialog messages, depending on field requirement levels or other conditional logic. The key benefit of this would be the need not to resort to complex functions to achieve this functionality and to, instead, allow error messages or alerts to be configured via the PowerApps GUI. A similar comparison can perhaps be made with Business Rules in Dynamics 365 Customer Engagement. Before their introduction, developers would have to resort to JScript functions to display form-level alerts based on conditional logic. Not everyone is familiar with JScript, meaning a significant barrier was in place for those looking to implement arguably straightforward business logic. Now, with Business Rules, we have the ability to replicate a lot of functionality that JScript allows for, speeding up the time it takes to implement solutions and providing a much clearer mechanism of implementing straightforward business logic. Hopefully, in the months ahead, we can start to see a similar type of feature introduced within PowerApps to aid in developing a similar solution demonstrated in this post.

Slight change of pace with this week’s blog post, which will be a fairly condensed and self-indulgent affair – due to personal circumstances, I have been waylaid somewhat when it comes to producing content for the blog and I have also been unable to make any further progress with my new YouTube video series. Hoping that normal service will resume shortly, meaning additional videos and more content-rich blog posts, so stay tuned.

I’ve been running the CRM Chap blog for just over 2 years now. Over this time, I have been humbled and proud to have received numerous visitors to the site, some of whom have been kind enough to provide feedback or to share some of their Dynamics CRM/365 predicaments with me. Having reached such a landmark now seems to be good a time as any to take a look back on the posts that have received the most attention and to, potentially, give those who missed them the opportunity to read them. In descending order, here is the list of the most viewed posts to date on the crmchap.co.uk website:

  1. Utilising SQL Server Stored Procedures with Power BI
  2. Installing Dynamics CRM 2016 SP1 On-Premise
  3. Power BI Deep Dive: Using the Web API to Query Dynamics CRM/365 for Enterprise
  4. Utilising Pre/Post Entity Images in a Dynamics CRM Plugin
  5. Modifying System/Custom Views FetchXML Query in Dynamics CRM
  6. Grant Send on Behalf Permissions for Shared Mailbox (Exchange Online)
  7. Getting Started with Portal Theming (ADXStudio/CRM Portals)
  8. Microsoft Dynamics 365 Data Export Service Review
  9. What’s New in the Dynamics 365 Developer Toolkit
  10. Implementing Tracing in your CRM Plug-ins

I suppose it is a testament to the blog’s stated purpose that posts covering areas not exclusive to Dynamics CRM/365 rank so highly on the list and, indeed, represents how this application is so deeply intertwined with other technology areas within the Microsoft “stack”.

To all new and long-standing followers of the blog, thank you for your continued support and appreciation for the content 🙂

Office 365 groups have been a recurring topic of the blog in recent months – we’ve seen how we can force Office 365 to use custom domains when creating groups for the very first time and how you can straightforwardly integrate an Office 365 Group within Dynamics 365 for Customer Engagement. With this in mind, there is little point in providing a detailed description of what they are and how they can be used; suffice to say, if you are wanting to collaborate closely with internal/external colleagues for a particular project or department, Office 365 Groups are an excellent candidate to consider.

One of the cornerstones of Office 365 Groups is the ability for all conversations to be tracked via the use of a dedicated shared mailbox. This perhaps explains why the Office 365 portal will refuse to let you add any user within your organisation who does not have an Exchange Online license assigned to them. Case in point – let’s assume we have a user account with no such license assigned to them on the Office 365 portal:

When attempting to add this user into an Office 365 group, we get a message to let us know No match was found for the user account entered and, as a consequence, it cannot be added to the group:

From this, you can perhaps make the assumption that Office 365 groups are not supported at all for users who do not have a mailbox. This is notwithstanding the fact there are several different business scenarios that may necessitate this requirement:

  • A kiosk/”light-use” account may require access to the group to upload documents and manage the SharePoint site.
  • Integration with external applications may be required, stipulating the need for a service account to authenticate with the group to retrieve/add content dynamically.
  • The need to configure an account for external users to access, that is sufficiently locked down and inexpensive to maintain.

Fortunately, as with many other things relating to Office 365, we can get around this limitation within the Office 365 portal by resorting to PowerShell and adding the John Doe user account above to the Group.

The first step towards achieving this is to boot up a PowerShell window. Make sure you have access to this on your machine of choice then, after opening the application using the Run as administrator option, execute the following script:

##Set Execution Policy to Remote Signed - required to fully execute script

Set-ExecutionPolicy RemoteSigned

##Connect to Exchange Online. Enter administrator details when prompted.

$UserCredential = Get-Credential

$Session = New-PSSession -ConfigurationName Microsoft.Exchange -ConnectionUri https://outlook.office365.com/powershell-liveid/ -Credential $UserCredential -Authentication Basic -AllowRedirection

Import-PSSession $Session

##Add the non-mailbox user to the Office 365 Group. Substitute the Links value with the username of the account to add.

Add-UnifiedGroupLinks -Identity "Test Office 365 Group" -LinkType Members -Links john.doe@domain.com

##Confirm that the user has been added successfully by returning the Group member list

Get-UnifiedGroupLinks -Identity "Test Office 365 Group" -LinkType Members

##Cleanup by disconnecting from Exchange Online

Remove-PSSession $Session

The penultimate command will make something similar to the below appear in the console window. Interestingly, note that the John.Doe test user has a RecipientType value of User:

Now that the user has been added successfully, they will be able to access the SharePoint site for the group by navigating to the SharePoint library URL. This will look similar to the below and can be grabbed by logging in as another user who has the RecipientType value of UserMailbox and navigating to the Groups SharePoint site:

https://<Your On Microsoft domain prefix>.sharepoint.com/sites/<Your Office 365 Group Name/

Note that this will be on the only way the non-mailbox user can access the site. For example, there will be no link to SharePoint within Office 365 to guide you to the above location. After logging in, you should be greeted with a window similar to the one below:

The John Doe “light-use” account, as referenced above, will have full access to everything that is accessible within SharePoint concerning the Office 365 Group, such as:

  • The Home/News Page
  • Shared Documents Folder (“Documents“)
  • Shared OneNote (“Notebook“)
  • All Site Pages
  • Planner (navigated to via the following link: https://tasks.office.com/<Your Office 365 Primary domain>/en-GB/Home/Planner/)

Conversely, the following features will be inaccessible (due to requiring a Mailbox):

  • Conversations
  • Shared Calendar

If for example, you attempt to navigate to Conversations within SharePoint, you will get the following error message:

This is, perhaps, a small price to pay for what ends up to be a pretty feature-rich experience that can be given to additional users within your organisation at virtually no cost. Perhaps another good excuse to start rolling out Office 365 Groups across your tenant in the near future 🙂

In the early days of Office 365, you would be accustomed to a certain kind of experience when purchasing licenses as a small/medium size business (SMB) customer. As these types of organisations are typically too small to warrant the cost for Enterprise Agreements or Volume Licensing, your only recourse to buying Office 365 services was via the portal itself. At this time, any involvement with a Microsoft Partner would be minimal or even non-existent. Partners would only enter the picture if a business opted to grant them Partner of Record status, thereby allowing them to manage aspects of your subscription behind the scenes. This process, while wholly sufficient, did have some notable gaps and, if you were an organisation focused on tightly managing all aspects of your customer journey, could be prone to change or interruption via interference from Microsoft

The Cloud Solutions Provider programme (or CSP for short) is Microsoft’s “next-generation” opportunity for partners to get directly involved as part of a customers journey onto Office 365, Dynamics 365 and/or Azure and aims to resolve some of the issues highlighted above. Instead of turning directly to Microsoft when you need a new license subscription or have an issue with a particular Office 365 opportunity, customers would instead deal directly with a CSP provider, who will be able to offer them all of this, and more. Everyone wins – the customer, CSP provider and Microsoft itself – and here’s just a few reasons why:

Moving to CSP can save you money

Perhaps the most important reason of all to consider CSP 🙂 The price you will pay for pretty much every single Office 365 Subscription offering available via Microsoft directly will be lower if purchased from a CSP partner. In most cases, this will typically result in a 10-15% reduction across the board guaranteed; a figure which, depending on the size of your organisation, could be a significant portion of your per annum IT spend. In addition, there is no need to wait for your subscription anniversary to switch – any early cancellation charges will be credited in full by Microsoft, should you cancel at any point in your subscription and migrate to the equivalent CSP subscription.

CSP users can benefit from special promotions, previews and other deals unavailable via Microsoft Direct

One example of this at the moment is the preview for Microsoft 365 Business – the next evolutionary step for Office 365 – which is accessible to those who are working with CSP providers currently. Other promotions may also appear from time to time, so you should be speaking to your CSP provider regularly to ensure that they are informing you of any potential discounts or offers available.

CSP enables your current Microsoft Partner to support you better

If you are working with a Microsoft Partner to help support your Office 365 services or Dynamics 365 deployments, there’s a good chance that they may have spoken to you about CSP or migrated you across already. The reasons for this will not be purely based on an altruistic desire to reduce your monthly running costs; by having their customers operating under CSP licensing, Partners are granted additional information regarding your subscriptions and their usage. They also become the de facto organisation that needs to be contacted in case any issues occur relating to the subscription. A customer who, for example, contacts Microsoft directly regarding an Exchange Online issue on their CSP subscription will instead be referred back to the CSP Partner in the first instance; they will then be responsible for escalating the case to Microsoft if required. In most circumstances, this can surely be seen as a plus and in helping Partners to work more closely with their customers.

The above example also goes some way towards explaining why CSP license prices are cheaper compared to going directly to Microsoft. By placing Partner organisations at the front-line of dealing with common 1st/2nd Line support issues, Microsoft can reduce the number of support professionals it allocates internally  and place the burden instead on Microsoft Partners to do the “heavy lifting”, particularly when it comes to dealing with easy to resolve issues (i.e. any support request that can be resolved via the Administration Centre).

It’s for Azure as well…with some caveats

Chances are if you are using Office 365 within your organisation, then you will also be consuming some additional Azure services on top of this – either Virtual Machine(s), storage, websites or even some database capacity. The good news is that you can also look at moving your Azure subscriptions across to CSP, with the same benefits available: reduced monthly costs and the ability for your partner of choice to support you better.

At the time of writing this post, the key “red flag” I would draw you towards when considering Azure CSP is what you lose compared to a Pay As You Go or other direct subscription. For example, ongoing and previous usage history will not be visible on the Azure portal and, chances are, you will only get full visibility of your Azure usage costs at the time when you are billed by your CSP partner. If you typically prefer to micro-manage your ongoing Azure usage costs, then a 10-15% saving may not be a fair trade-off for losing this visibility.

Finally, don’t be surprised if this becomes the de facto way of buying Office 365/Azure in the future if you are an SMB

I mentioned above one reason why CSP license costs are cheaper, and through this, you can begin to see the writing on the wall for SMB’s. This is not necessarily a bad thing. My own personal preference would be in dealing with a Microsoft Partner as opposed to Microsoft direct, as Partners will generally be a lot more flexible and reactive to work with. Having assumed that Microsoft can generate significant internal cost savings and also give eager Partner organisations the opportunity to fill the void, why would they not then turn round and say “We’re sorry, but if you are an organisation that employs 300 people or less, then please speak to a Microsoft Partner for further assistance.”? Certainly, the vibe and talk around CSP at the moment would seem to indicate that this is the long-term trajectory for the programme. Watch this space, but it will be interesting to see in the future whether the Microsoft Direct route is downplayed or removed completely if your potential license order per annum is in only in the hundreds of £’s.