Earlier this year, the Business Applications team at Microsoft published a blog post titled Modernizing the way we update Dynamics 365, a significant article that anyone involved with Dynamics 365 Customer Engagement (D365CE) should take time to read through carefully. Indeed, as a direct consequence of the announcements contained in this post, you may now be receiving emails similar to the below if you are an administrator of a D365CE instance:

Changes to well-established processes always can produce a mixture of questions, confusion and, in some cases, frustration for IT teams. Once you have fully understood the broader context of where D365CE is going and also the general sea change that has been occurring since Satya Nadella came to the helm of Microsoft, the modifications to the Update Policy are welcome and, arguably, necessary to ensure that D365CE users and administrators can take advantage of the different features available within a D365CE subscription today. For those who are still scratching their head at all of this, what follows is a summary of the most significant changes announced, along with some additional observations from me on why it is important to embrace all these changes wholeheartedly.

Version 9 or Bust

Longstanding D365CE online customers will be used to the regular update cycles and the ability to defer significant application updates for a period. While this can be prudent for more complex deployments, it does potentially lead to additional overhead in the long term, mainly if Microsoft were ever to force this decision upon you. The well-established advice has always been to proactively manage your updates at your own pace, ideally targeting at least one major update a year. If you haven’t been doing this, then you may now be in for a particularly nasty shock. As mentioned in the article:

Since every customer will be updated on the continuous delivery schedule, your organization needs to update to the latest version if you are running an older version of Dynamics 365…For customers who are currently running older versions of Dynamics 365, we will continue to provide you with the ability to schedule an update to the latest version and want to make sure this effort is as seamless as possible through continuous improvements in our update engine…For Dynamics 365 (online) customer engagement applications, we sent update communications in May to all customers running v8.1 and have scheduled updates. Customers running v8.2 should plan to update to the latest version by January 31, 2019.

This point is reinforced in a much more explicit manner in the email above:

ACTION NEEDED: Schedule an update for your organization by August 16, 2018. The date for the update should be on or before January 31, 2019. You can find instructions on how to schedule and approve updates here.

If you do not schedule an update in the timeframe mentioned above, Microsoft will schedule an automatic update for your organization on August 17, 2018 and communicate the dates. The automatic update would take place during your normal maintenance window.

The implications should be clear, and it certainly seems that, in this scenario, Microsoft has decided to eliminate any degree of upgrade flexibility for its customers.

No Changes to Minor/Major Updates?

Again, if you are familiar with how D365CE Online operates, there are two flavours of updates:

  • Minor updates, to address bugs, performance and stability issues, are continually pushed out “behind the scenes”. You have no control over when and how these are applied, but they will always be carried out outside your regions regular business hours. The Office 365 Administrator Portal is your go-to place to view any past or upcoming minor updates.
  • Major updates generally referred to as Spring Wave or Fall Update releases. There has always been two of these each year, and administrators can choose when to apply these to a D365CE instance. These updates can generally take much longer to complete but will introduce significant new features.

Microsoft’s new Update Policy seems to leave this convention intact, with a noteworthy change highlighted below in bold:

We are transforming how we do service updates for Dynamics 365 (online). We will deliver two major releases per year – April and October – offering new capabilities and functionality. These updates will be backward compatible so your apps and customizations will continue to work post update. New features with major, disruptive changes to the user experience are off by default. This means administrators will be able to first test before enabling these features for their organization.

In addition to the two major updates, we will continue to deploy regular performance and reliability improvement updates throughout the year. We are phasing deployments over several weeks following safe deployment practices and monitoring updates closely for any issues.

Some additional detail around this will be welcome to determine its effectiveness, but I can imagine some parity with the Experimental Features area in PowerApps, which – contrary to the above – will often introduce new features that are left on by default. A derived version of this feature would, I think, work in practice and hopefully streamline the process of testing new functionality without necessarily introducing it unintended into Production environments.

On-Premise Implications

One question that all of this may raise is around the on-premise version of the application, in particular for those who consume online subscriptions, but use their dual-usage rights to create an on-premise instance instead. This situation becomes more pressing when you consider the following excerpt from the refreshed Update Policy:

Dynamics 365 (Online) version 8.2 will be fully supported until January 31, 2019. Customers running version 8.2 should plan to update to the latest version prior to this date.

Now, the important thing to stress is the fact that the above quotation makes explicit reference to Online as opposed to on-premise. Also, when we check Microsoft’s product lifecycle page, you can see that Mainstream support for this product ends in January 2021. On-premise administrators can, I would suggest, breath a sigh of relief for now, but I would urge you to contact Microsoft to clarify your support arrangements. I think as an organisation as well, you should also start seriously asking yourself the following questions:

  • Is an online, Software as a Service (SaaS) version of the application going to be easier to maintain compared with dedicated server environment(s)?
  • Is it possible to achieve all of your required functionality and business requirements using the Online version of the application?
  • Do you want to ensure you have the latest features exposed to you and can take advantage of Online-only functionality, such as Export to Excel Online?

If the answer to all of the above questions is “Yes”, then a migration to the Online version of the application would be my recommended course of action, as it wouldn’t surprise me if Microsoft were to stop releasing new versions/service packs for the on-premise version of the product or eliminate it by providing inexpensive sandbox instance options.

Recommended Next Steps

The fundamental aim of this move is a housekeeping exercise for Microsoft. The announcement earlier this year of version 2 of the Common Data Service – which is utilising the existing D365CE SQL database for all customisations – is the key driver behind a lot of the changes that are happing in the CRM/D365CE space today. The focus for the product team at Microsoft currently appears to be towards knitting together both experiences into the PowerApps interface. What this means in practice is that the traditional customisation experience is going to slowly fade away, to be replaced by Model-Driven App development instead. This refresh is excellent for several reasons – it provides a much-needed interface update, while also exposing additional functionality to us when creating business applications – but it is evident that such a massive change will require a consistent playing field for all of Microsoft’s existing version 8.2 and below D365CE customers. Getting everyone onto version 9 of the application is the apparent result towards rolling out version 2 of the Common Data Service for all existing customers while ensuring that D365CE can fit into the mould of other application release cycles across Microsoft today. Embracing the change should not be a difficult thing to do and, when you understand the broader context, there is no other option available on the table.

So what are the key takeaways from this that you should be thinking about in the weeks and months ahead? My suggested list would include the following:

  • Schedule your update to version 9 of the application manually well in advance of August 16th 2018. DO NOT put yourself in a position where you are having an update forced upon you and give yourself the amount of time needed to successfully plan and test your upgrade in good time before January 31st 2019. I would also anticipate upgrade slots may start to fill up fast if you want to wait until as late as possible too 🙂
  • Start considering your future strategy in regards to the on-premise version of the application, if you are still supporting these environments. I speak with literally zero authority here, but I would not be surprised if the on-premise version of the application receives no further update at all in future or that dual-usage rights get revoked entirely.
  • Get familiar with the Common Data Service and Power Apps, as this is increasingly going to be the go-to area D365CE development and administration in the future. If you get the opportunity to attend one of Microsoft’s PowerApp in Day course, then be sure to go along without any hesitation. I would also be happy to speak to and help anyone with training in this area.
  • As with anything in life, embrace change, be proactive and identify areas of opportunity from this. A good one from my perspective is the potential to more easily introduce the staggering array of differing Business Application functionality, with the outcome being the ability to quickly deploy bespoke business applications that achieve any possible requirement and integrate with a wide variety of different services or datasets.

The Voice of the Customer (VoC) add-on solution for Dynamics 365 Customer Engagement (D365CE) presents a really nice way of incorporating survey capabilities within your existing Dynamics application estate, without any additional cost or significant administrative overhead. I’ve talked about the tool previously, within the context of specific application errors, and I can attest to its capabilities – both as a standalone solution and as one that can be leveraged alongside other D365CE functionality to generate additional value.

One feature that is particularly useful is the ability to include diverse Survey Response controls. This can cover the range of anticipated user inputs that most web developers would be used to – text inputs, ratings, date pickers etc. – along with more marketing specific choices such as Net Promoter Score and even a Smilies rating control. The final one of these really does have to be seen to wholly appreciate:

I hope you agree that this is definitely one of those features that becomes so fun that it soaks up WAY more time than necessary 🙂

One of the final options that VoC provides you is the ability to upload files to a Survey Response, which is stored within the application and made retrievable at any time by locating the appropriate Survey Response record. You can customise the guidance text presented to the user for this control, such as in the example below:

Uploaded files are then saved onto an Azure Blob Storage location (which you don’t have direct access to), with the access URL stored within D365CE. The inclusion of this feature does provide the capability to accommodate several potential business scenarios, such as:

  • Allowing a service desk to create an automated survey that allows error logs or screenshots to be uploaded for further diagnosis.
  • The gathering of useful photographic information as part of a pre-qualification process for a product installation.
  • Enabling customers to upload a photo that provides additional context relating to their experience – either positive or negative.

Putting all of this aside, however, and there are a few things that you should bear in mind when first evaluating this feature for your particular requirements. What follows is my list of major things to be aware of, along with some tips to sidestep any issues.

Privacy concerns…

To better understand why this is relevant, it helps to be aware of exactly how files can be stored on Azure. Azure file storage works on the principle of “blobs” (i.e. files), which can only be created within a corresponding Storage Container. These can be configured using a couple of different options, depending on how you would like to access your data, which is elaborated upon in this really helpful article:

You can configure a container with the following permissions:

  • No public read access: The container and its blobs can be accessed only by the storage account owner. This is the default for all new containers.

  • Public read access for blobs only: Blobs within the container can be read by anonymous request, but container data is not available. Anonymous clients cannot enumerate the blobs within the container.

  • Full public read access: All container and blob data can be read by anonymous request. Clients can enumerate blobs within the container by anonymous request, but cannot enumerate containers within the storage account.

To presumably mitigate the need for complex deployments of the VoC solution, all uploaded Survey Response files are saved in Full public read access storage containers, meaning that anyone with the URL can access these files. And, as mentioned already, administrators have no direct access to the Azure Storage Account to modify these permissions, potentially compounding this access problem. Now, before you panic too much, the VoC solution deliberately structures the uploaded file in the following format:

https://<VoC Region Identifier>.blob.core.windows.net/<Survey Response GUID>-files/<File GUID>-<Example File>

This degree of complexity added during this goes a long way towards satisfying any privacy concerns – it would be literally impossible for a human being or computer to guess what a particular uploaded file path is, even if they did have the Survey Response record GUID – but this still does not address the fact that the URL can be freely accessed and shared by anyone with sufficient permissions over the Survey Response entity in D365CE. You should, therefore, take appropriate care when scoping your security privileges within D365CE and look towards carrying out a Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) over the type of data you are collecting via the upload file control.

…even after you delete a Survey Response.

As mentioned above, the Blob Storage URL is tagged to the Survey Response record within D365CE. So what happens when you delete this record? The answer, courtesy of Microsoft via a support request:

Deleting Survey Response should delete the file uploaded as part of the Survey Response

Based on my testing, however, this does not look to be the case. My understanding of the VoC solution is that it needs to regularly synchronise with components located on Azure, which can lead to a delay in certain actions completing (publish a Survey, create Survey Response record etc.). However, a file from a Survey Response test record that I deleted still remains accessible via its URL up to 8 hours after completing this action. This, evidently, raises a concern over what level of control you have over potentially critical and sensitive data types that may be included in uploaded files. I would urge you to carry out your own analysis as part of a PIA to sufficiently gauge what impact, if any, this may have on your data collection (and, more critically, storage) activities.

Restrictions

For the most part, file upload controls are not a heavily constrained feature, but it is worthwhile to keep the following restrictions in mind:

  • Executable file types are not permitted for upload (.exe, .ps1, .bat etc.)
  • Larger file types may not upload successfully, generating 404 server errors within the control. There is not a documented size limitation, but my testing would indicate that files as big as 60MB will not upload correctly.
  • Only one file upload control is allowed per survey.

The last of these limitations is perhaps the most significant constraint. If you do have a requirement for separate files to be uploaded, then the best option is to provide instructions on the survey, advising users to compress their files into a single .zip archive before upload.

Conclusions or Wot I Think

Despite what this post may be leaning towards, I very much believe the VoC solution and, in particular, the ability to upload Survey Response files, is all in a perfect, working condition. Going a step further on this, when viewed from a technical standpoint, I would even say that its method of execution is wholly justified. With the advent of the General Data Protection Regulations (GDPR) earlier this year, current attention is all around ensuring that appropriate access controls over data have been properly implemented, that ensures the privacy of individuals is fully upheld. Here is where the solution begins to fall over to a degree and evidence of the journey that VoC has made in becoming part of the Dynamics 365 “family” becomes most apparent. As can be expected, any product which is derived from an external acquisition will always present challenges when being “smushed” with a new application system. I have been informed that there is an update coming to the VoC solution in August this year, with a range of new features that may address some of the data privacy concerns highlighted earlier. For example, the option will be provided for administrators to delete any uploaded file within a Survey Response on-demand. Changes like this will surely go a long way towards providing the appropriate opportunities for VoC to be fully utilised by businesses looking to integrate an effective, GDPR-proof, customer survey tool.

I was very honoured and excited to be involved with the very first D365UG/CRMUG North West Chapter Meeting earlier this week, hosted at the Grindsmith just off Deansgate in Manchester. This is the first time that a D365UG/CRMUG event has taken place in the North West, and we were absolutely stunned by the level of interest this event generated – all in all, 37 people attended, representing a broad spectrum of Microsoft partners and organisations of varying sizes.

I very much got the impression that the amount of Dynamics 365 Customer Engagement (D365CE) users in the North West far exceed any number you could assume, and I am really looking forward to seeing how future events develop as we (hopefully!) get more people involved. Despite a few technical glitches with the AV facilities, the feedback we have received to both presentations has been overwhelmingly positive, so a huge thanks to everyone who turned up and to our presenters for the evening

In this post, I wanted to share my thoughts on both sets of presentations, provide an answer to some of the questions that we didn’t get around to due to time constraints and, finally, provide a link to the slide deck from the evening.

Transform Group – The Patient Journey

The first talk of the evening was provided courtesy of Bill Egan at Edgewater Fullscope, who took us through Transform Group’s adoption of D365CE. Bill provided some really useful insights – from both an organisation and a Microsoft partner’s perspective – of the challenges that any business can face when moving across to a system like D365CE. As with any IT project, there were some major hurdles along the way, but Bill very much demonstrated how the business was able to roll with the punches and the very optimistic 16 weeks planned deployment presents an, arguably, essential blueprint in how IT projects need to be executed; namely, targeted towards delivering as much business benefit in a near immediate timeframe.

The key takeaways from me out of all this was in emphasising the importance of adapting projects quickly to changing business priorities and to recognise the continued effort required to ensure that business systems are regularly reviewed and updated to suit the requirements of not just the users, but the wider business.

Power Up Your Power Apps

The second presentation was literally a “head to head” challenge with Craig Bird from Microsoft and Chris “The Tattooed CRM Guy” Huntingford from Hitachi Solutions, seeing who could build the best PowerApps. In the end, the voting was pretty unanimous and Craig was the proud recipient of a prize worthy of a champion. I hope Craig will be wearing his belt proudly at future events 🙂

I found the presentation particularly useful in clearing up a number of worries I had around the Common Data Service and the future of D365CE. The changes that I saw are very much emphasised towards providing a needed facelift to the current customisation and configuration experience within D365CE, with little requirement to factor in migration and extensive learning of new tools to ensure that your D365CE entities are available within the Common Data Service. Everything “just works” and syncs across flawlessly.

https://twitter.com/joejgriffin/status/1009531079492079622

In terms of who had the best app, I think Craig literally knocked the socks off everyone with his translator application. Although I include myself in this category, I was still surprised to see that PowerApps supports Power BI embedded content, courtesy of Chris – a really nice thing to take away for any aspirational PowerApp developer.

Questions & Answers

We managed to get around to most questions for the first presentation but not for the second one. Here’s a list of all the questions that I am able to provide an answer to. I’m still in the process of collating together responses to the other questions received, so please keep checking back if you’re burning question is not answered below:

Presentation

For those who missed the event or are wanting to view the slides without a purple tinge, they will be downloadable for the next 30 days from the following location:

https://jamesgriffin-my.sharepoint.com/:p:/g/personal/joe_griffin_gb_net/EbRAws0urypMkrGyqCzoTdMB4ggjUQI4_npQlEZAYhea4w?e=U3lvf5

Looking Ahead

The next chapter meeting is scheduled to take place on the 2nd of October (venue TBC). If you are interested in getting involved, either through giving a presentation or in helping to organise the event, then please let us know by dropping us a message:

  • Email: crmuguknw@gmail.com
  • Twitter: @CRMUG_UK_NW

The Voice of the Customer (VoC) solution, available as part of Dynamics 365 Customer Engagement (D365CE), works most effectively when you are tightly integrating your survey’s around other features or datasets stored within the application. That’s not to say that it must only ever be utilised in tandem as opposed to isolation. If you have the requirement to quickly send out a survey to a small list of individuals (regardless of whether they are D365CE Contact records), VoC presents a natural choice if you are already paying for D365CE Online, as it is included as part of your subscription cost. As services such as SurveyMonkey tend to charge money to let you develop more complex, bespoke branded surveys, VoC, by comparison, offers all of this to you at no additional cost. Just don’t be buying licenses to use only this specific piece of functionality. 🙂 Ultimately, the upside of all this is that VoC represents a solid solution in and of itself, but working with the solution in this manner is just the icing on top of the cake. When you start to take into account the myriad of different integration touchpoints that VoC can instantly support, thanks to its resident status within D365CE, this is where things start to get really exciting. With this in mind, you can look to implement solutions that:

  • Send out surveys automatically via e-mail.
  • Route survey responses to specific users, based on answers to certain questions or the Net Promoter Score (NPS) of the response.
  • Tailor a specific email to a customer that is sent out after a survey is completed.
  • Include survey data as part of an Azure Data Export Profile and leverage the full power of T-SQL querying to get the most out of your survey data.

It is in the first of these scenarios – sending out surveys via a WorkFlow – that you may find yourself encountering the error referenced in the title of this post. The error can occur when you look to take advantage of the survey snippet feature as part of an Email Template – in laymen’s terms, the ability to send out a survey automatically and tag the response back to the record that it is triggered from. To implement this, you would look towards creating a WorkFlow that looks similar to the below:

With then either the desired email message typed out or a template specified that contains the survey snippet code, available from a published survey’s form:

All of this should work fine and dandy up until the user in question attempts to trigger the workflow; at which point, we see the appropriate error message returned when viewing the workflow execution in the System Jobs area of the application:

Those who are familiar with errors like these in D365CE will instantly realise that this is a security role permission issue. In the above example, the user in question had not been granted the Survey User role, which is included as part of the solution and gives you the basic “set menu” of permissions required to work with VoC. A short while following on from rectifying this, we tried executing the workflow again and the error still occurred, much to our frustration. Our next step was to start combing through the list of custom entity privileges on the Security Role tab to see if there was a permission called Azure Deployment or similar. Much to our delight, we came across the following permission which looked like a good candidate for further scrutiny:

When viewing this security role within the Survey User role, the Read permission for this organization-owned custom entity was not set. By rectifying this and attempting to run the workflow again, we saw that it executed successfully 🙂

It seems a little odd that the standard user security role for the VoC module is missing this privilege for an arguably key piece of functionality. In our situation, we simply updated the Survey User security role to include this permission and cascaded this change accordingly across the various dev/test/prod environments for this deployment. You may also choose to add this privilege to a custom security role instead, thereby ensuring that it is properly transported during any solution updates. Regardless, with this issue resolved, a really nice piece of VoC functionality can be utilised to streamline the process of distributing surveys out to D365CE customer records.

Back only a few years ago, when events such as a reality TV star becoming President of the USA were the stuff of fantasy fiction, Microsoft had a somewhat niche Customer Relationship Management system called Dynamics CRM. Indeed, the very name of this blog still attests to this fact. The “CRM” acronym provides a succinct mechanism for describing the purposes of the system without necessarily confusing people straight out of the gate. For the majority of its lifespan, “CRM” very accurately summarised what the core system was about – namely, a sales and case management system to help manage customer relations.

Along the way, Microsoft acquired a number of organisations and products that offered functionality that, when bolted onto Dynamics CRM, greatly enhanced the application as a whole. I have discussed a number of these previously on the blog, so I don’t propose to retread old ground. However, some notable exceptions from this original list include:

Suffice to say, by the start of 2016, the range of functionality available within Dynamics CRM was growing each month and – perhaps more crucially – there was no clear mechanism in place from a billing perspective for each new solution offered. Instead, if you had a Dynamics CRM Professional license, guess what? All of the above and more was available to you at no additional cost.

Taking this and other factors into account, the announcement in mid-2016 of the transition towards Microsoft Dynamics 365 can be seen as a welcome recognition of the new state of play and the ushering in of Dynamics CRM out of the cold to stand proud amongst the other, major Microsoft product offerings. Here’s a link to the original announcement:

Insights from the Engineering Leaders behind Microsoft Dynamics 365 and Microsoft AppSource

The thinking behind the move was completely understandable. Dynamics CRM could no longer be accurately termed as such, as the core application was almost unrecognisable from its 2011 version. Since then, there has been a plethora of additional announcements and changes to how Dynamics 365 in the context of CRM is referred to in the wider offering. The road has been…rocky, to the say the least. Whilst this can be reasonably expected with such a seismic shift, it nevertheless does present some challenges when talking about the application to end users and customers. To emphasise this fact, let’s take a look at some of the “bumps” in the road and my thoughts on why this is still an ongoing concern.

Dynamics 365 for Enterprise and Business

The above announcement did not go into greater detail about how the specific Dynamics 365 offerings would be tailored. One of the advantages of the other offerings within the Office 365 range of products is the separation of business and enterprise plans. These typically allow for a reduced total cost of ownership for organisations under a particular size within an Office 365 plan, typically with an Enterprise version of the same plan available with (almost) complete feature parity, but with no seat limits. With this in mind, it makes sense that the initial detail in late 2016 confirmed the introduction of business and enterprise Dynamics 365 plans. As part of this, the CRM aspect of the offering would have sat firmly within the Enterprise plan, with – you guessed it – Enterprise pricing to match. The following article from encore at the time provides a nice breakdown of each offering and the envisioned target audience for each. Thus, we saw the introduction of Dynamics 365 for Enterprise as a replacement term for Dynamics CRM.

Perhaps understandably, when many businesses – typically used to paying £40-£50 per seat for their equivalent Dynamics CRM licenses – discovered that they would have to move to Enterprise plans and pricing significantly in excess of what they were paying, there were some heads turned. Microsoft Partners also raised a number of concerns with the strategy, which is why it was announced that the Business edition and Enterprise edition labels were being dropped. Microsoft stated that they would:

…focus on enabling any organization to choose from different price points for each line of business application, based on the level of capabilities and capacity they need to meet their specific needs. For example, in Spring 2018, Dynamics 365 for Sales will offer additional price point(s) with different level(s) of functionality.

The expressed desire to enable organisations to “choose” what they want goes back to what I mentioned at the start of this post – providing a billing/pricing mechanism that would support the modular nature of the late Dynamics CRM product. Its introduction as a concept at this stage comes a little late in the whole conversation regarding Dynamics 365 and represents an important turning point in defining the vision for the product. Whether this took feedback from partners/customers or an internal realisation to bring this about, I’m not sure. But it’s arrival represents the maturity in thinking concerning the wider Dynamics 365 offering.

Dynamics 365 for Customer Engagement

Following the retirement of the Business/Enterprise monikers and, in a clear attempt to simplify and highlight the CRM aspect of Dynamics 365, the term Customer Engagement started to pop-up across various online support and informational posts. I cannot seem to locate a specific announcement concerning the introduction of this wording, but its genesis appears to be early or mid-2017. The problem is that I don’t think there is 100% certainty yet on how the exact phrasing of this terminology should be used.

The best way to emphasise the inconsistency is to look to some examples. The first is derived from the name of several courses currently available on the Dynamics Learning Portal, published this year:

Now, take a look at the title and for the following Microsoft Docs article on impending changes to the application:

Notice it yet? There seems to be some confusion about whether for should be used when referring to the Customer Engagement product. Whilst the majority of articles I have found online seem to suggest that Dynamics 365 Customer Engagement is the correct option, again, I cannot point to a definitive source that states without question the correct phraseology that should be used. Regardless, we can see here the birth of the Customer Engagement naming convention, which I would argue is a positive step forward.

The Present Day: Customer Engagement and it’s 1:N Relationships

Rather handily, Customer Engagement takes us straight through to the present. Today, when you go to the pricing website for Dynamics 365, the following handy chart is presented that helps to simplify all of the various options available across the Dynamics 365 range:

This also indirectly confirms a few things for us:

  • Microsoft Dynamics 365 Customer Engagement and not Microsoft Dynamics 365 for Customer Engagement looks to be the approved terminology when referring to what was previously Dynamics CRM.
  • Microsoft Dynamics 365 is the overarching name for all modules that form a part of the overall offering. It has, by the looks of things, replaced the original Dynamics 365 for Enterprise designation.
  • The business offering – now known as Dynamics 365 Business Central – is in effect a completely separate offering from Microsoft Dynamics 365.

When rolled together, all of this goes a long way towards providing the guidance needed to correctly refer to the whole, or constituent parts, of the entire Dynamics 365 offering.

With that being said, can it be reliably said that the naming “crisis” has ended?

My key concern through all of this is a confusing and conflicting message being communicated to customers interested in adopting the system, to the potential end result of driving them away to competitor systems. This appears to have been the case for about 1-2 years since the original Dynamics 365 announcement, and a large part of this can perhaps be explained by the insane acquisition drive in 2015/6. Now, with everything appearing to slot together nicely and the pricing platform in place to support each Dynamics 365 “module” and the overall offering, I would hope that any further change in this area is minimal. As highlighted above though, there is still some confusion about the correct replacement terminology for Dynamics CRM – is it Dynamics 365 Customer Engagement or Dynamics 365 for Customer Engagement? Answers on a postcode, please!

Another factor to consider amongst all of this is that naming will constantly be an issue should Microsoft go through another cycle of acquisitions focused towards enhancing the Dynamics 365 offering. Microsoft’s recent acquisition plays appear to be more focused towards providing cost optimization services for Azure and other cloud-based tools, so it can be argued that a period of calm can be expected when it comes to incorporating acquired ISV solutions into the Dynamics 365 product range.

I’d be interested to hear from others on this subject, so please leave a comment below if you have your own thoughts on the interesting journey from Dynamics CRM to Dynamics 365 Customer Engagement