If you are looking at automating the execution of SQL Server Integration Services .dtsx packages, then there are a few options at your disposal. The recommended and most streamlined route is to utilise the SSIDB catalog and deploy your packages to the catalog from within Visual Studio. This gives you additional flexibility if, when working with SQL Server 2016 or greater, on whether to deploy out single or multiple packages together. An alternative approach is to deploy your packages to the file system and then configure an Agent Job on SQL Server to execute the job based on a schedule and with runtime settings specified. This is as simple as selecting the appropriate dropdown option on the Agent Job Step configuration screen and setting the Package source value to File system:

Deploying out in this manner is useful if you are restricted from setting up the SSISDB catalog on your target SQL Server instance or if you are attempting to deploy packages to a separate Active Directory domain (I have encountered this problem previously, much to my chagrin). You also have the benefit of utilising other features available via the SQL Server Agent, such as e-mail notifications on fail/success of a job or conditional processing logic for job step(s). The in-built scheduling tool is also pretty powerful, enabling you to fine tune your automated package execution to any itinerary you could possibly conjure up.

I encountered a strange issue recently with a DTSX package configured via the SQL Agent. Quite randomly, the package suddenly started failing each time it was scheduled for execution, with the following error generated in the log files:

Failed to decrypt an encrypted XML node because the password was not specified or not correct. Package load will attempt to continue without the encrypted information.

The issue was a bit of a head-scratcher, with myself and a colleague trying the following steps in an attempt to fix the issue:

  • Forcing the package to execute manually generated the same error – this one was a bit of a longshot but worth trying anyway 🙂
  • When executing the package from within Visual Studio, no error was encountered and the package executed successfully.
  • After replacing the package on the target server with the package just executed on Visual Studio (same version) and manually executing it, once again the same error was thrown.

In the end, the issue was resolved by deleting the Agent Job and creating it again from scratch. Now, if you are diagnosing the same issue and are looking to perform these same steps, it may be best to use the Script Job as option within SQL Server Management Studio to save yourself from any potential headache when re-building your Job’s profile:

Then, for good measure, perform a test execution of the Job via the Start Job at Step… option to verify everything works.

I am still stumped at just what exactly went wrong here, but it is good to know that an adapted version of the ancient IT advice of yore can be referred back to…

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